Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Jeremy Parzen

Jeremy Parzen
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After obtaining his Ph.D. in Italian literature at U.C.L.A. in 1997, Jeremy Parzen moved to New York City where he shifted his focus to food and wine. By 1998, he was the chief wine writer for the English-language edition of La Cucina Italiana. In 2005, he published his annotated translation of Maestro Martino's 15th century cookery book, The Art of Cooking (University of California Press). In 2007, he launched his blog DoBianchi.com (named after the Venetian expression for two glasses of white wine). Since that time, he has published countless articles on Italian food and wine, including bylines for publications like Decanter and Wine and Spirits, which named him a "Master of Place" in 2017. Known for his humanist perspective onto the world of Italian enogastronomy, he works as wine and restaurant industry consultant from his home office in Houston, where he and his wife Tracie (a native Texan) are raising their two daughters. A former rock musician and songwriter, Jeremy continues to compose and record music with and for his family. He was honored to be named an Italian Association of Wine Merchants ambassador in 2018 for his "profound scholarship in the humanities, his great knowledge of winemaking, and his excellence in communications."
As required by the Moscato d'Asti DOCG appellations regulations, all grapes for Moscato d'Asti must be grown on hillsides and in soil types that are typically found in those hills.
moscato asti
But among the sea of Moscato varieties there is none that rivals Moscato Bianco, otherwise known as Moscato di Canelli
Moscato d'Asti, its origins and its future, represent an unexplored frontier in the ongoing Italian wine renaissance.